Plavix May Cause Cerebral, Gastrointestinal Bleeding

Are you a Plavix user who has suffered from cerebral bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, or from other internal hemorrhaging, such as bleeding ulcers? Plavix, the popular blood thinner drug could be to blame. Recent studies indicate that Plavix patients are more likely to experience gastrointestinal bleeding and other bleeding than what was previously thought. Our Plavix lawyers want to hear from anyone who suffered from this drug side effect.

Victims of this blood thinner may be eligible to file a Plavix lawsuit.  Plavix lawyers at our personal injury firm who specialize in defective drug litigation are offering free lawsuit evaluations to victims of Plavix side effects, such as internal hemorraging, thrombotic thrombocytepenic purpura (TTP), and heart attack. We urge you to contact one of our Plavix attorneys today to protect your legal rights.

Plavix Issues

For years, it was thought the Plavix would cause less gastrointestinal bleeding, cerebral bleeding, and other internal hemorraging than an alternative blood thinner, Warfarin. But recently, a study conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found the risk of internal hemorrhaging among Plavix-aspirin patients was significantly higher than thought.

While the CDC study did find that Warfarin was associated with a higher rate of bleeding than the Plavix-aspirin combo, the combination therapy did not do as well in that area as was expected. For both regimens, the number of hospital admissions because of bleeding was similar. And bleeding-related visits to emergency department visits, such as for bleeding ulcers, and cerebral bleeding, were only 50 percent lower for those on the Plavix-aspirin combination prescription.

Another study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that patients taking Plavix are 12 times more likely to suffer recurrent bleeding ulcers, including cerebral bleeding and Plavix gastrointestinal bleeding than those who received a combination of aspirin and a heartburn pill.

Heartburn drugs like Prilosec, Nexium, Prevacid, Aciphex, and Protonix are often prescribed to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding from the Plavix-aspirin combo. But now, it appears that Plavix users can’t even count on those drugs to reduce the risk of Plavix gastrointestinal bleeding, from bleeding ulcers and so on. In November 2009, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) warned that Prilosec could impede the body’s production of the liver enzyme CYP2C19. This enzyme is needed to convert Plavix to its active form.

It was already known that people who have reduced functioning of their CYP2C19 liver enzyme are unable to convert Plavix to its active form. Because Prilosec inhibits CYP2C19, it may impact the effectiveness of Prilosec. The FDA said it was unknown if other heartburn drugs in the same class as Prilosec, known as Proton Pump Inhibitors, might interfere with Plavix, but advised patients not to take Nexium (esomeprazole), Tagamet and Tagamet HB (cimetidine), Diflucan (fluconazole), Nizoral (ketoconazole), VFEND (voriconazole), Intelence (etravirine), Felbatol (felbamate), Prozac, Serafem, Symbyax (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine) and Ticlid (ticlopidine).

Legal Help for Victims of Plavix

Parker Waichman LLP is one of the preeminent personal injury law firms in the U.S. Parker Waichman LLP is listed in Best Lawyers, the oldest and most respected peer-review publication in the legal profession. The attorneys of Parker Waichman LLP are also the authors of “Personal Injury Law for Dummies,” an easy to understand guide to all aspects of personal injury law.

If you or a loved one suffered from Plavix side effects, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, cerebral bleeding, other internal hemarraging, bone marrow damage, heart attack, stroke or were diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytepenic purpura (TTP),  you may be entitled to receive compensation for medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and other damages. For a free legal consultation with one of our Plavix attorneys, please fill out our online form or call 1-800 LAW INFO (1-800-529-4636) today.

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Carriers of CYP2C19 Gene Variant May Suffer Reactions from Plavix

Plavix side effects, Plavix side effects lawyersThe CYP2C19 gene variant may be slow metabolizers of the anti-blood clotting drug, Plavix, which may make it less effective for them. This is yet another Plavix side effect adding to a host of other Plavix side effects.

“According to OregonLive.com, the CYP2C19 gene variant is more common in people of Asian descent. But it does affect other ethnicities as well, including fewer than 5 percent of Caucasians and African-Americans. But simply carrying the gene variant isn’t a good predictor that an individual will not be able to metabolize a drug. One study of Han Chinese – an ethnic group in which the gene variant affects roughly 40 percent of the population – only 20 percent turned out to be slow metabolizers.”

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has ordered that Plavix have the warning placed on the box stating that people who have reduced function of their CYP2C19 liver enzyme can’t convert Plavix effectively into its active form. This means these slow metabolizers may not receive the full benefits of Plavix and may still remain at risk for heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death. Previously, the FDA had a warning on the Plavix label telling people with the CYP2C19 variant that they may have trouble converting Plavix to its active form, making it less effective.

According the FDA, it’s estimated that 2 percent to 14 percent of the U.S. have the CYP2C19 variant, making them poor metabolizers.

It is up to doctors to determine if the patient should get an alternative dose of Plavix, or change the patient to other anti-platelet medications. DNA tests are available to determine if a patient has the CYP2C19 variant, making them poor metabolizers.

“According to the DNA testing firm Genelex, CYP2C19 acts on 5-10 percent of drugs in current clinical use. Genetic testing can look for common changes CYP2C19 gene to determine if an individual may have difficulty metabolizing a drug. While this may help doctors choose the best drug and dose for an individual with less trial and error, it’s not clear how worthwhile such testing is. What studies have been done on this type of testing have failed to find a clear benefit.”

Plavix is also associated with a number of side effects including gastrointestinal bleeding and cerebral hemorrhaging, eye bleeding, musculoskeletal bleeding, respiratory tract bleeding and skin bleeding. Other Plavix side effects are Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura or TTP, a rare blood condition that causes blood clots to form throughout the body and hypotension if combined with antibiotics.

If you or a loved one suffered a Plavix side effect including a heart attack, stroke, gastrointestinal bleeding or TTP , you may have valuable legal rights. To discuss your case with one of our Plavix side effect lawyers, please fill out our online form, or call 1 800 LAW INFO (1-80-529-4636) today.

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Plavix Use Linked to Thrombotic Thrombocytepenic Purpura (TTP)

Plavix linked to TTP

Plavix, the brand name for the drug Clopidogrel Bisulfate, has been prescribed to a number of patients who are particularly at risk for having their blood platelets join together and causing clots that lead to heart attack, and strokes. While it’s been successfully used to treat this potential condition, it’s also been linked to a rare blood condition, known as Thrombotic Thrombocytepenic Purpura (TTP).  Ironically, Plavix has also been associated with causing the very conditions it is meant to prevent, such as heart attacks and strokes.  Additional side effects linked to Plavix include gastrointestinal bleeding and cerebral bleeding, as well as bleeding ulcers.

Plavix has been linked to Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura , otherwise known as TTP, a rare condition that leads to a significant reduction in the number of blood platelets. Although it only occurs in about one to three out of every 1 million people, TTP is a serious condition that results in death in 10 to 20 percent of patients.

While Thrombotic Thrombocytepenic Purpura (TTP) has been genetically passed on to children, when it occurs as an adult it is most often accompanied by the development of an antibody that inhibits certain enzyme activity responsible for regulating the production of blood platelets in the body. In addition to Plavix, oral birth control pills, quinine and Neoral – a drug used to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs, have been known to cause TTP.

A number of Plavix lawsuits have been filed that claim Plavix maker Sanofi-Aventis and Bristol-Myers Squibb have not adequately warned users of the side effect. The Plavix lawsuit also claim that while the number of Plavix patients who develop TTP Plavix side effects is small, it’s possible to contract TTP even if a patient takes the drug for a very short period of time.

The symptoms that accompany Thrombotic Thrombocytepenic Purpura (TTP) can be easily confused with those of a stroke, such as headaches, confusion, malaise, fever, paralysis or difficulty speaking. Anyone exhibiting these Plavix side effects should contact a doctor immediate for observation and blood tests. With proper treatment, more than 80 percent of TTP patients survive following an extensive round of plasma transplants.

Source: www.nih.gov



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A Primer on Thrombotic Thrombocytepenic Purpura – TTP

A Primer on TTP

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpora (TTP), abreviated to TTP or alternatively called Moschcowitz syndrome, is a rare blood disorder that causes a number of microscopic blood clots to form in small blood vessels throughout the body.

The disease is caused by the spontaneous pooling of platelets that coagulate in the small blood vessels. There are two different forms of TTP: idiopathic and secondary. The idiopathic form is connected to the fact that affected patients don’t produce enough of the ADAMTS13 enzyme that is responsible for linking platelets, blood clots and the blood vessel wall during blood coagulation, or the process by which blood clots naturally.

Secondary TTP occurs when a patient exhibits typical TTP symptoms that are accompanied by a number of specific medical conditions, including cancer, bone marrow transplantation due to bone marrow damage, pregnancy, use of platelet aggregation inhibitors or immunosuppressants, as well as an HIV infection.

Amongst Plavix side effects, the drug has been linked to thrombotic thrombocytepenic purpura (TTP), which occurs in about one to three out of every 1 million people.  thrombotic thrombocytepenic purpura (TTP) is a serious condition that results in death in 10 to 20 percent of patients. Since the early 1990s, the standard treatment for TTP has involved removing a patient’s blood plasma and replacing it with donor plasma. The treatment is required daily for a period of one to eight weeks, at which point patients’ bodies will cease to consume platelets and begin to see normal hemoglobin levels.

Additional Plavix side effects include the very conditions that Plavix is often prescribed to ward against.  Other side effects of the blood thinner include: heart attack, strokes, internal hemorraging, cerebral bleeding, bone marrow damage, gastrointestinal bleeding, and bleeding ulcers.

A number of Plavix lawsuits have been filed claiming Plavix makers Sanofi-Aventis and Bristol-Myers Squibb have not adequately warned users of Plavix side effects such as TTP. The Plavix lawsuit also claims that while the number of Plavix patients who develop TTP Plavix side effects is small, it’s possible to contract thrombotic thrombocytepenic purpura (TTP) even if a patient takes the drug for a very short period of time.

The symptoms that accompany TTP can be easily confused with those of a stroke, such as headaches, confusion, malaise, fever, paralysis or difficulty speaking.  They can potentially be extremely serious if ignored, perhaps being signs of something more serious, such as cerebral bleeding, or internal hemorraging.  Anyone exhibiting these symptoms should contact a doctor immediate for observation and blood tests. With proper treatment, more than 80 percent of TTP patients survive following an extensive round of plasma transplants.

Source: Wikipedia.org

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